Thursday, April 1, 2010

Understand Deadlock

A deadlock is a situation in which two computer programs sharing the same resource are effectively preventing each other from accessing the resource, resulting in both programs ceasing to function.

The earliest computer operating systems ran only one program at a time. All of the resources of the system were available to this one program. Later, operating systems ran multiple programs at once, interleaving them. Programs were required to specify in advance what resources they needed so that they could avoid conflicts with other programs running at the same time. Eventually some operating systems offered dynamic allocation of resources. Programs could request further allocations of resources after they had begun running. This led to the problem of the deadlock. Here is the simplest example:

Program 1 requests resource A and receives it.
Program 2 requests resource B and receives it.
Program 1 requests resource B and is queued up, pending the release of B.
Program 2 requests resource A and is queued up, pending the release of A.

Now neither program can proceed until the other program releases a resource. The operating system cannot know what action to take. At this point the only alternative is to abort (stop) one of the programs.

Learning to deal with deadlocks had a major impact on the development of operating systems and the structure of databases. Data was structured and the order of requests was constrained in order to avoid creating deadlocks.


Below is a funny example of car deadlock.
:)

4 comments:

vikram said...

very very helpfull....... thnx...

sunny said...

thank, from sunny saxena

jaiveer said...

csagsax

ultimatejokes said...

thanqq...